4 Ways to Build Learning Confidence

Learning new material is often overwhelming and can lead children to get defensive or shut down if they feel like the material is too difficult. Here are some simple strategies to help build their confidence. 

words-of-confidence

1. Say It Out Loud– When students encounter material for the first time, it is helpful if they can talk it out with a peer, parent, or teacher. This verbal processing that takes place settles the learner, provides an opportunity to try out the language associated with the new topic, and arms them with confidence.

2. Brain Dump After learning new material for a set period of time, do a brain dump on a blank piece of paper. This serves the purpose of helping the student realize that learning and knowledge acquisition have been happening.Taking a deep breath, dumping the information on a blank page, and seeing what it looks like prepares the student for success on the assessment. This brain dump then serves as a study guide.

3. Not All In A Straight Line For many students, learning is not linear. On an assessment, one of the keys to remember is that the first question might not be the best place to start. Sometimes, a student will look at the first question on an assessment and panic, thinking he or she knows nothing. Instead, students should take a holistic approach, spend some time scanning the entire assessment, and look for a positive entry point where they feel most confident. 

4. Be Visual or MusicalThe artist and the musician live inside each student, and tapping into that creative side can allow the student to learn and acquire knowledge more effectively. When the  information seems overwhelming and the student doesn’t know where to begin putting the information in the form of a song can help them master the material and remember it more easily.

For more tips like these check out http://www.edutopia.org/

At Learning Foundations we have an Executive Functions program designed specifically to help students develop more effective study and organizational skills. If this is a constant struggle for your child, give us a call today at (210) 495-2626, or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

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