The ADHD Food Fix

Did you know studies suggest that dietary changes may improve the symptoms of hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity in ADHD kids? Find out how to make your family´s diet ADHD-Friendly with these meal suggestions from ADDitude Magazine.

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The Best Breakfast-A breakfast rich in protein jump-starts better learning and behavior, say experts. Why? Protein is used by the brain to make neurotransmitters—chemicals that help brain cells talk with each other. For your morning menu, try scrambled eggs with whole-grain toast; or natural peanut butter on whole-grain bread. Make sure to skip sugary cereals, which can cause spikes in blood sugar and increase hyperactivity in ADHD kids.

Smart Snacks-Since ADHD medications tend to blunt the appetite, it’s important to make every calorie count. You’ll also want to load up on protein (to sustain alertness) and complex carbohydrates (to avoid blood sugar spikes and crashes). Quick, calorie-filled snacks combos for ADHD kids include: creamy or cheesy soups with croutons; string cheese, crackers, and an apple; a banana and peanut butter.

Balanced Lunch and Dinner-When preparing an ADHD-friendly meal, half of the plate should be filled with fruits and veggies, one-fourth with protein, and one-fourth with complex carbs. This combination of food may control swings in behavior caused by hunger, surges in blood sugar, or a shortfall of a particular nutrient. In addition, whole grains help prevent blood sugar levels from spiking and then plummeting, which can increase inattention.

Healthy Desserts-If your child pushes away the main course or has appetite loss due to ADHD medication, use dessert to get some extra calories and nutrition into her diet. Studies show that high-sugar diets may increase inattention in ADHD kids, so opt for less sugary treats. Here are healthy dessert options: homemade applesauce; yogurt parfait — alternate layers of yogurt and fruit; or chocolate pudding made with skim milk.

Foods to stay away from-Several studies suggest that artificial additives and sugar may increase hyperactivity in ADHD children. Fresh, unprocessed foods are best for ADHDers, as they contain few additives. To be safe, check labels and cut back on foods containing artificial colors, flavors, dyes, preservatives, and excess sugar.

 

If you are interestedreverse-diet-autism in founding out more about the correlation between Diet and Behavior join us  Monday, April 28th at 6:30 for session two of our
Dietary Habits classes.

At our learning center we have a program specifically designed to help students with attention problems, if you feel your child isn´t reaching their potential because of their learning disability give us a call today at (210)495-2626 or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetingson Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

 

A Nag-Free Tool to Help Your ADHD Child

A parent’s worst nightmare is getting in a time crunch and asking their child to do something and then being ignored or argued with.

Here is a simple technique that helps your child understand, remember, and actually DO what they need to do without reminders.

Sounds like magic right?

It’s actually a simple tool from ADDitude Magazine, called a think-through. A think-through maximizes the likelihood of your child cooperating by fixing the expectation or rule firmly in their long term memory. When you use a think-through, it is not you but your child who is saying what they have to do. That shift has a powerful, positive impact on their memory and on their willingness to do it.

How-Help-Your-Child-Listen-Cooperate

Here are the basic steps of doing a think-through:

  1.  Choose a Neutral Time- Never try to do a think-through right after something has gone wrong. You will be annoyed instead of calm and your child will be resentful. A neutral time is when neither of you are in a hurry nor annoyed.
  2. Ask, Don´t Tell- Ask your child several leading questions about the behavior you want to see more of. Phrase your questions so they cannot be answered with a yes or no.
  3. Your Child Answers In Detail- Your child tells you what they should do in as many details as possible. The more details the better, it will stick in their memory so ask several follow up questions to get them to expand their answers. The only time you switch form asking to telling is when your child´s answer is incomplete or inaccurate. In that case, clarify what you mean, and ask some more questions, until you are sure your child understands the rule or routine.

For more tips like this visit ADDitudemag.com/resource-centers/index.html

 At our learning center we have a program specifically designed to help students with attention problems, if you feel your child isn´t reaching their potential because of their learning disability give us a call today at (210)495-2626 or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

Study Finds Cognitive Training to Still Be Effective 10 Years After Completion

According to a study supported by the National Institute of Health training to improve cognitive abilities in older people lasted in some degree 10 years after the program was completed.

Commit-yourself-to-lifelong-learningThe results were particularly strong in correlation with those who receive training in reasoning and processing speed. The study suggests we should continue to pursue cognitive training as an intervention that might help maintain the mental abilities of older people so they can remain independent and active in their communities. This study proves it´s never too late to improve your cognitive abilities.

Click here to read the entire article about this study http://www.nia.nih.gov/newsroom/2014/01/cognitive-training-shows-staying-power

If you or your child is struggling in these area gives us a call today at (210) 495-2626, or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

Fine Motor Skills Provide a Surprising Pathway to School Readiness

fine motor handsWhen it comes to achievement, many people are surprised to learn that a major predictor is the quality of a student´s fine motor skills. There are several reasons for this correlation.

  • The first is there are some areas in the brain (the prefrontal cortex to be exact) that are involved in both the processing of motor information and cognitive tasks. Therefore children who have greater motor abilities also tend to have better achievement because stronger motor skills early in life strengthen the neural connections that also assist children in many academic tasks. This link is particularly strong when it comes to math.
  • Also children who have well developed motor abilities at a young age are better able to navigate and manipulate their environments allowing them to gain a greater range of experiences early in life which set the stage for stronger academic skills.
  • An additional benefit of strong, early fine motor skills is the direct benefit in the classroom. Children use fine motor skills in schools when they write and draw and most of their early learning is derived from these processes. Children who are more comfortable doing these things will have more processes free to focus on classroom lessons rather than devoting most of their effort to the process of writing.

Based on these findings the most successful interventions for students who don´t possess strong fine motor skills early on or have a developmental disability, is a program that incorporates a number of tasks that require repetitive fine motor movements.

10+ToddlerEvidence suggests that these types of interventions should focus on developing and improving the child´s visual spatial integration skills to have the greatest impact.

Click this link to read the entire article http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/psyched/201402/fine-motor-skills-and-academic-achievement

If your child is struggling in this area our learning center has program specifically design to improve visual spatial integration skills. Give us a call today at (210) 495-2626, or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

New Research Finds Reading Changes Brain Connectivity

Stories shape our lives and in some cases help define a person, but what actually happens inside your brain when you read a great novel?

 A new study in which students read a thrilling novel and then had their brains scanned reveals heightened connectivity within the student´s brains following the nightly reading assignment and then again five days after they finished the book. The areas with enhanced connectivity, were the area of the brain associated with language comprehension and the area associated with sensations and movement. It´s not clear how long these changes persist but the author states,

“At a minimum, we can say that reading stories –- especially those with strong narrative arcs -– reconfigure brain networks for at least a few days. It shows how stories can stay with us. This may have profound implications for children and the role of reading in shaping their brains.”

Click this link to read the entire article from The Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/30/reading-change-brain-connectivity_n_4504566.html?utm_hp_ref=brain

If your child is struggling with reading, Give us a call today at (210) 495-2626, or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

New Research Sheds Light on the Link between Dsylexia and Visuospatial Processing Strengths

A student with visuospatial processing strengths is a student who learns holistically rather than in a step by step fashion. Visual imagery plays an essential part in these students’ learning process. Meaning the student processes primarily in pictures rather than words. These students have many talents in non-language visuospatial domains, such as art, architecture, and various arenas related to three dimensional thinking. Unfortunately the American Education system if based on linear sequential thinking, which is particularly difficult for these types of students and requires them to translate their usual thought processes to take in new information, which can be a daunting and time consuming task.

Click here to learn more about visual spatial learners http://www.dyslexia.com.html

According to a new study by Haskins researchers in which they examined the cognitive and neural bases of visuospatial processing abilities for different kinds of material in adolescents with dyslexia compared to typically developing peers, students with Dyslexia show a visuospatial processing advantage. It’s well known that children with Dsylexia, although they have specific problems with language impacting their ability to read, their brains are different not defective. This study suggests their difference could be the source of their many strengths. Research found that subjects with Dyslexia showed more expert-like brain activation patterns than non dyslexic subjects when processing figures, while the opposite was true for print processing.

Click here to read the entire article  http://interdys.org/DyslexiaAndVisuospatialProcessing.html

If this sounds like your child, at Learning Foundations we offer programs that utilize your child’s strengths while retraining their brains to process language and print more effectively. Give us a call today at (210)495-2626 or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

Teaching Time Management to Students with Learning Disabilities

A New Year brings all the normal day to day tasks and responsibilities. For those of you who have added new tasks or activities based on your goals for the New Year, time is often in short supply. Time management is a challenge for everyone but for those with learning disabilities it is even more challenging. I came across an excellent article on the site Learning Disabilities Online or LD Online entitled, Teaching Time Management to Students with Learning Disabilities” that tackles this topic.

The article explains that even the concept of time can be difficult for a student with learning disabilities to grasp and developing a sense of time and how long it takes to perform a particular task is essential for students to learn time management and achieve academic success. 

Students with learning disabilities need high structure, explicit teaching, and extended opportunities to practice strategies until they develop independent skills. Here is how to best break down this concept allowing your student to understand and practice these valuable skills:

  1. First your student needs to understand Task Analysis-This is the process of identifying what needs to get done to finish a given undertaking. To estimate time with accuracy, students need to know the steps required to complete a task. For instance, an assignment to read a chapter and define vocabulary for a quiz the next day requires a student to: (1) read, (2) look up the words in a dictionary, and (3) identify and remember information for a quiz.
  2. Then they must be able to use Time Estimation Effectively-Accurately estimating how much time it takes to complete tasks is essential for long term planning. At the end of the article is a great activity you can have your student practice to develop both these necessary skills for successful time management.

Click this link to read this article and activity http://www.ldonline.org/article/23676/

At Learning Foundations we have an Executive Functions program designed specifically to help students develop time management and organizational skills. If this is a constant struggle for your child, give us a call today at (210) 495-2626, or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:30 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.