5 Ways Dyslexia Can Affect Your Child´s Social Life

Dyslexia and social skillsMost people with Dyslexia in their family know how much of a struggle reading and writing can be, but did you know Dyslexia can also affect social skills?

Here are some common social skill challenges and things you can do to aid in development of these important skills.

  1. Your child doesn´t understand jokes or sarcasm-Children with Dyslexia have trouble understanding humor. Tell jokes or funny stories at the dinner table to help your child practice responding.
  2. Your child have trouble finding the right words-Children with Dyslexia have trouble finding words  especially if they feel strongly about a subject or need to respond quickly. Give your child time to think before responding and slow down the overall pace of the conversation.
  3. Your child misses social cues-Children with Dyslexia may not pick up on body language and other social cues. Watch your child´s favorite shows with the volume turned off. Ask your child to guess how a character is feeling based on their body language and facial expressions.
  4. Your child hesitates to message their friends-Your child may shy away from texting because they have difficulty understanding abbreviations, to help show them how abbreviations work. Some are based on spelling (“I don´t know”= idk) and others on how letters and numbers sounds (“later”=l8tr).
  5. Your child remembers things inaccurately-Children with Dyslexia usually have trouble with their short term memory. Help improve memory skills by playing games like having your child name the different cars on the street and having them repeat it back to you a few minutes later.

If you feel like your child´s Dyslexia is limiting their potential at Learning Foundations, we use a scientifically proven multi-sensory Orton-Gillingham based program to help students with Dyslexia. If your child is struggling with reading, give us a call today at (210) 495-2626, or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

Don´t Let Your Child Lose What They´ve Worked So Hard to Achieve Over the Summer

As the end of the school year looms near most kids are overjoyed with the thought of a Summer without books and homework, but taking the summer off can lead to a loss of those hard earned skills and is what educators call “the summer slide”.  Studies have found this is especially detrimental to student with learning difficulties.

Not to fear here are some fun educational activities you can do with your children to keep  their brains in shape over the summer:

  1. MakeSummerReading summer learning part of the fun by encouraging struggling readers to use audiobooks to build their knowledge and vocabulary while exposing them to age-appropriate content beyond their reading level.
  1. Help kids “frontload” for the next school year by exposing them to information they will be able to apply to next year´s curriculum. For example, students who will be learning about American history next year might prompt a family trip to the Freedom  Trail in Boston or to a local area of historical interest.
  2. Sign up for a library summer reading program these usually offer awesome prizes and incentives to inspire students to read and improve their school performance
  3. Limit screen time to activities that build competencies-games that build math skills, word games, and films that will inspire students to the read the book on which they were based. Even education screen time in no substitute for unstructured play or quite reading under a favorite tree.
  4. Read books together as a family and make a treat or visit a place that goes along with the theme book when you finish it.
  5. Make one day a week science day and build a project, collect specimens on a nature hike, or try out some interesting experiments.Summer-Learning
  6. Taking a family trip or vacation? Help your children create a travel journal and document events of the day and gather pictures and mementos.
  7. Do your children love to help you in the kitchen? Have them practice measuring and following recipes directions while trying out some new recipes.
  8. Visit local museums, galleries, city gardens etc.
  9. Sign your child up for an academic based day camp or class in a subject they enjoy.                                                                            At our learning center we offer fun and challenging summer programs to help keep improve your child´s abilities and keep their brains in tip top shape. Give us a call today at (210) 495-2626, or JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities.

Jack Muir Laws, Naturalist and Artist, Shares How His Dyslexia is a Gift

Jack Muir Laws calls himself an “Exquisite Dyslexic” and explains how his Dyslexia has allowed him to be more present and observant.  Take a look at his lecture he gave for the nonprofit Dyslexic Advantage´s conference on Dyslexia and Talent. 

 

Click here to see more videos from the conference https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyab_VSBCAk

At Learning Foundations, we use a scientifically proven multi-sensory Orton-Gillingham based program to help students with Dyslexia use their gifts and achieve their potential. If your child is struggling with reading, give us a call today at (210) 495-2626, or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

4 Ways to Build Learning Confidence

Learning new material is often overwhelming and can lead children to get defensive or shut down if they feel like the material is too difficult. Here are some simple strategies to help build their confidence. 

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1. Say It Out LoudWhen students encounter material for the first time, it is helpful if they can talk it out with a peer, parent, or teacher. This verbal processing that takes place settles the learner, provides an opportunity to try out the language associated with the new topic, and arms them with confidence.

2. Brain Dump- After learning new material for a set period of time, do a brain dump on a blank piece of paper. This serves the purpose of helping the student realize that learning and knowledge acquisition have been happening.Taking a deep breath, dumping the information on a blank page, and seeing what it looks like prepares the student for success on the assessment. This brain dump then serves as a study guide.

3. Not All In A Straight Line- For many students, learning is not linear. On an assessment, one of the keys to remember is that the first question might not be the best place to start. Sometimes, a student will look at the first question on an assessment and panic, thinking he or she knows nothing. Instead, students should take a holistic approach, spend some time scanning the entire assessment, and look for a positive entry point where they feel most confident. 

4. Be Visual or Musical-The artist and the musician live inside each student, and tapping into that creative side can allow the student to learn and acquire knowledge more effectively. When the  information seems overwhelming and the student doesn’t know where to begin putting the information in the form of a song can help them master the material and remember it more easily.

For more tips like these check out http://www.edutopia.org/

At Learning Foundations we have an Executive Functions program designed specifically to help students develop more effective study and organizational skills. If this is a constant struggle for your child, give us a call today at (210) 495-2626, or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

The ADHD Food Fix

Did you know studies suggest that dietary changes may improve the symptoms of hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity in ADHD kids? Find out how to make your family´s diet ADHD-Friendly with these meal suggestions from ADDitude Magazine.

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The Best Breakfast-A breakfast rich in protein jump-starts better learning and behavior, say experts. Why? Protein is used by the brain to make neurotransmitters—chemicals that help brain cells talk with each other. For your morning menu, try scrambled eggs with whole-grain toast; or natural peanut butter on whole-grain bread. Make sure to skip sugary cereals, which can cause spikes in blood sugar and increase hyperactivity in ADHD kids.

Smart Snacks-Since ADHD medications tend to blunt the appetite, it’s important to make every calorie count. You’ll also want to load up on protein (to sustain alertness) and complex carbohydrates (to avoid blood sugar spikes and crashes). Quick, calorie-filled snacks combos for ADHD kids include: creamy or cheesy soups with croutons; string cheese, crackers, and an apple; a banana and peanut butter.

Balanced Lunch and Dinner-When preparing an ADHD-friendly meal, half of the plate should be filled with fruits and veggies, one-fourth with protein, and one-fourth with complex carbs. This combination of food may control swings in behavior caused by hunger, surges in blood sugar, or a shortfall of a particular nutrient. In addition, whole grains help prevent blood sugar levels from spiking and then plummeting, which can increase inattention.

Healthy Desserts-If your child pushes away the main course or has appetite loss due to ADHD medication, use dessert to get some extra calories and nutrition into her diet. Studies show that high-sugar diets may increase inattention in ADHD kids, so opt for less sugary treats. Here are healthy dessert options: homemade applesauce; yogurt parfait — alternate layers of yogurt and fruit; or chocolate pudding made with skim milk.

Foods to stay away from-Several studies suggest that artificial additives and sugar may increase hyperactivity in ADHD children. Fresh, unprocessed foods are best for ADHDers, as they contain few additives. To be safe, check labels and cut back on foods containing artificial colors, flavors, dyes, preservatives, and excess sugar.

 

If you are interestedreverse-diet-autism in founding out more about the correlation between Diet and Behavior join us  Monday, April 28th at 6:30 for session two of our
Dietary Habits classes.

At our learning center we have a program specifically designed to help students with attention problems, if you feel your child isn´t reaching their potential because of their learning disability give us a call today at (210)495-2626 or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetingson Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

 

A Nag-Free Tool to Help Your ADHD Child

A parent’s worst nightmare is getting in a time crunch and asking their child to do something and then being ignored or argued with.

Here is a simple technique that helps your child understand, remember, and actually DO what they need to do without reminders.

Sounds like magic right?

It’s actually a simple tool from ADDitude Magazine, called a think-through. A think-through maximizes the likelihood of your child cooperating by fixing the expectation or rule firmly in their long term memory. When you use a think-through, it is not you but your child who is saying what they have to do. That shift has a powerful, positive impact on their memory and on their willingness to do it.

How-Help-Your-Child-Listen-Cooperate

Here are the basic steps of doing a think-through:

  1.  Choose a Neutral Time- Never try to do a think-through right after something has gone wrong. You will be annoyed instead of calm and your child will be resentful. A neutral time is when neither of you are in a hurry nor annoyed.
  2. Ask, Don´t Tell- Ask your child several leading questions about the behavior you want to see more of. Phrase your questions so they cannot be answered with a yes or no.
  3. Your Child Answers In Detail- Your child tells you what they should do in as many details as possible. The more details the better, it will stick in their memory so ask several follow up questions to get them to expand their answers. The only time you switch form asking to telling is when your child´s answer is incomplete or inaccurate. In that case, clarify what you mean, and ask some more questions, until you are sure your child understands the rule or routine.

For more tips like this visit ADDitudemag.com/resource-centers/index.html

 At our learning center we have a program specifically designed to help students with attention problems, if you feel your child isn´t reaching their potential because of their learning disability give us a call today at (210)495-2626 or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.

Study Finds Cognitive Training to Still Be Effective 10 Years After Completion

According to a study supported by the National Institute of Health training to improve cognitive abilities in older people lasted in some degree 10 years after the program was completed.

Commit-yourself-to-lifelong-learningThe results were particularly strong in correlation with those who receive training in reasoning and processing speed. The study suggests we should continue to pursue cognitive training as an intervention that might help maintain the mental abilities of older people so they can remain independent and active in their communities. This study proves it´s never too late to improve your cognitive abilities.

Click here to read the entire article about this study http://www.nia.nih.gov/newsroom/2014/01/cognitive-training-shows-staying-power

If you or your child is struggling in these area gives us a call today at (210) 495-2626, or

JOIN US and other parents at our Parent Information Meetings on Tuesday nights at 7:00 pm. This is an opportunity to ask questions and explore possibilities about how to best help your bright but struggling child.